Running as a service

If you want to run Mopidy as a service using either an init script or a systemd service, there’s a few differences from running Mopidy as your own user you’ll want to know about. The following applies to Debian, Ubuntu, Raspbian, and Arch. Hopefully, other distributions packaging Mopidy will make sure this works the same way on their distribution.

Configuration

All configuration is in /etc/mopidy/mopidy.conf, not in your user’s home directory.

mopidy user

The Mopidy service runs as the mopidy user, which is automatically created when you install the Mopidy package. The mopidy user will need read access to any local music you want Mopidy to play.

Subcommands

To run Mopidy subcommands with the same user and config files as the service uses, you can use sudo mopidyctl <subcommand>. In other words, where you’ll usually run:

mopidy config

You should instead run the following to inspect the service’s configuration:

sudo mopidyctl config

The same applies to scanning your local music collection. Where you’ll normally run:

mopidy local scan

You should instead run:

sudo mopidyctl local scan

Service management with systemd

On modern systems using systemd you can enable the Mopidy service by running:

sudo systemctl enable mopidy

This will make Mopidy start when the system boots.

Mopidy is started, stopped, and restarted just like any other systemd service:

sudo systemctl start mopidy
sudo systemctl stop mopidy
sudo systemctl restart mopidy

You can check if Mopidy is currently running as a service by running:

sudo systemctl status mopidy

Service management on Debian

On Debian systems (both those using systemd and not) you can enable the Mopidy service by running:

sudo dpkg-reconfigure mopidy

Mopidy can be started, stopped, and restarted using the service command:

sudo service mopidy start
sudo service mopidy stop
sudo service mopidy restart

You can check if Mopidy is currently running as a service by running:

sudo service mopidy status

Service on OS X

If you’re installing Mopidy on OS X, see Running Mopidy automatically on login.